Dedicate the next decade to make India healthier – Vice President

The Vice President of India, Shri M Venkaiah Naidu today stressed the need to dedicate the next decade, from 2020 – 2030 to make India healthier by promoting healthy lifestyle, improving healthcare facilities, making healthcare affordable and accessible to all.

Inaugurating Delta Hospitals in Rajahmundry today, he expressed concern over the rising incidence of Non-Communicable Diseases owing to the change in lifestyle and dietary habits and stressed the need for following healthy lifestyle practices.

Quoting WHO report, he said that around 61 percent of deaths in India were attributed to non-communicable diseases, including heart disorders, cancer, and diabetes.

He suggested launching a national movement against the growing incidence of non-communicable diseases and wanted hospitals, the Indian Medical Association and the medical fraternity to take the lead in creating awareness among people, especially the youth.

Highlighting the importance of creating awareness among children and the youth of the hazards caused by unhealthy dietary habits and sedentary lifestyles, the Vice President said that students in schools must be encouraged to take part in at least one physical activity or yoga every day to stay fit and healthy.

Pointing out that achieving universal healthcare has many challenges including bridging the urban-rural divide in providing quality healthcare facilities, Shri Naidu urged the private sector to expand its footprint to the villages and remote rural areas and reach out to people with affordable healthcare.

“It is important for the private sector to complement the efforts of the government in reaching modern healthcare facilities to people living in rural areas,” he added.

Stating that the Government of India has launched several initiatives such as Ayushman Bharat to increase citizens’ access to good quality, affordable healthcare with an aim to achieve Universal Health Coverage by 2030, the Vice President called upon the Private sector to supplement government’s efforts in achieving the 2030 target.

Shri Naidu urged doctors to show empathy and compassion towards the patients and treat their profession as a mission to serve the people and not as a commercial vocation.

​Shri Naidu while referring to the high stature given to professionals such as Doctors and Teachers in Indian culture asked them to keep service as their motto. He urged them to show emp​​athy and compassion towards the patients and treat their profession as a mission to serve the people and not as a commercial vocation.

He stressed the need to innovate and adopt the best practices from world over to improve healthcare services and treatment protocols.

Shri Bharat Ram, Member of Parliament, Dr R.B.P.R Chowdary, Chairman & Managing Director of Delta Hospitals, Shri B. Sreenivas, Director, Delta Hospitals were among the dignitaries who graced the event.

Following is the full text of the speech –

Namaskar,

I am delighted to be present here in the beautiful city of Rajahmundry (Raja Mahendravaram) located on the banks of Godavari River today.

I am happy to inaugurate Delta Hospital headed by a highly talented and experienced team of doctors.

I am happy to know that the hospital is equipped to provide advanced treatment for cancer, cardiac and other ailments.

Dear sisters and brothers

Our country has made significant progress in improving its health outcomes over the years. We have eliminated polio, guinea worm disease, yaws, and maternal and neonatal tetanus.

It is to the credit of successive governments at the Centre and in various States that we could achieve it.

Our Total Fertility Rate (TFR) has reduced sharply from 3.4 in 1992-93 to 2.2 in 2015-16. Contrary to expectations, we were able to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in respect of the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR level of 130 against a target of 139) and almost succeeded in meeting the Under-5 child mortality target (U5 MR level of 43 against a target of 42).

The Government of India has initiated several reforms to improve citizens’ access to good quality, affordable healthcare with an aim to achieve Universal Health Coverage by 2030.

India’s vision for a healthy India requires a transformation of the delivery of health services in both urban and rural areas, by involving both the public and the private sectors. Apart from improving the infrastructure in the public health institutions at the district level and in villages, we need to overcome the shortage of doctors and trained paramedical personnel, both in urban and rural areas.

In the context of the rising Non-Communicable Diseases, owing to the change in lifestyle and dietary habits, there is an urgent need to focus on the health and wellbeing of all the people. WHO report says that around 61 percent of deaths in India are attributed to non-communicable diseases, including heart disorders, cancer, and diabetes.

We need to dedicate the next decade– from 2020 – 2030 to make India healthier by focusing on promoting a healthy lifestyle, improving healthcare facilities, making healthcare affordable and accessible to all.

The private sector must supplement the efforts of the government in improving the healthcare infrastructure, particularly in the rural areas and in providing affordable treatment to the common man.

As you all aware, the out-of-pocket expenses constitute a major chunk of the spending by patients. As a result, many poor and needy families end up in debts. This is an area of concern and needs to be addressed by all stakeholders in the health sector. I am happy that the Government of India has launched Ayushman Bharat to provide affordable health insurance to all.

In view of the growing incidence of non-communicable, the private must play a prominent role in setting up of NCD clinics in both urban and rural areas

All our efforts must be aimed at enhancing both the efficiency and quality of medical services. We need to innovate, learn from the best practices world over to improve healthcare without financially burdening people.

Dear sisters & brothers,

Achieving universal healthcare has many challenges including the urban-rural divide in quality healthcare facilities. The disparity in providing healthcare facilities, especially to those living in rural areas remains a major concern for all of us.

I urge the private sector to expand its footprint to the villages and remote rural areas and reach out to people with affordable healthcare. It is important for the private sector to complement the efforts of the government in reaching modern healthcare facilities people living in rural areas.

There is a need to launch a national movement against the growing incidence of non-communicable diseases and hospitals such as yours and the Indian Medical Association should take lead in creating awareness among the people, especially the youth.

Children and youth must be made aware of the hazards caused by unhealthy dietary habits and sedentary lifestyles. Students in schools must be encouraged to take part in at least one physical activity or yoga every day to stay fit and healthy.

I am sure the management of Delta Hospitals, Doctors and the professionals associated with the hospital will keep service as their motto and perform to the best of their abilities to deliver good healthcare to people of this region.

Jai Hind!”


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