History of Drawing…

Homo sapiens created the world’s first known drawing on this stone about 73,000 years ago in what is now South Africa. A small rock flake no larger than a house key is covered with a colossal surprise: the first known drawing ever made by a human. It is believed that drawing was used as a specialized form of communication before the invention of the written language, demonstrated by the production of cave and rock paintings around 30,000 years ago. These drawings, known as pictograms, depicted objects, and abstract concepts.

World’s oldest drawing is Stone Age crayon doodle. ‘Hashtag’ pattern drawn on a rock in the South African cave is 73,000 years old. There are many uses for drawing. Drawing is a form of communication that preceded writing and that continues to serve as another form of communication. “Drawings can do amazing things, They can tell stories, educate, inspire, reveal, entertain, and inform.” Drawing is a form of visual art in which a person uses various drawing instruments to mark paper or another two-dimensional medium. Instruments include graphite pencils, pen, and ink, various kinds of paints, inked brushes, colored pencils, crayons, charcoal, chalk, pastels, various kinds of erasers, markers, styluses, and various metals. Digital drawing is the act of using a computer to draw. Common methods of digital drawing include a stylus or finger on a touchscreen device, stylus- or finger-to-touchpad, or in some cases, a mouse. There are many digital art programs and devices.

Drawing is one of the oldest forms of human expression, with evidence for its existence preceding that of written communication. It is believed that drawing was used as a specialized form of communication before the invention of the written language, demonstrated by the production of cave and rock paintings around 30,000 years ago. These drawings, known as pictograms, depicted objects, and abstract concepts. The sketches and paintings produced by Neolithic times were eventually stylized and simplified into symbol systems and eventually into early writing systems. Before the widespread availability of paper, 12th-century monks in European monasteries used intricate drawings to prepare illustrated, illuminated manuscripts on vellum and parchment. Drawing has also been used extensively in the field of science, as a method of discovery, understanding, and explanation.

The medium is the means by which ink, pigment or color are delivered onto the drawing surface. Most drawing media are either dry (e.g. graphite, charcoal, pastels, Conté, silverpoint), or use a fluid solvent or carrier (marker, pen and ink). Watercolor pencils can be used dry like ordinary pencils, then moistened with a wet brush to get various painterly effects. Very rarely, artists have drawn with (usually decoded) invisible ink. Metalpoint drawing usually employs either of two metals: silver or lead. More rarely used are gold, platinum, copper, brass, bronze, and tinpoint.

Paper comes in a variety of different sizes and qualities, ranging from newspaper grade up to the high quality and relatively expensive paper sold as individual sheets. Papers vary in texture, hue, acidity, and strength when wet. Smooth paper is good for rendering fine detail, but a more “toothy” paper holds the drawing material better. Thus a coarser material is useful for producing deeper contrast.

Newsprint and typing paper may be useful for practice and rough sketches. Tracing paper is used to experiment over a half-finished drawing, and to transfer a design from one sheet to another. Cartridge paper is the basic type of drawing paper sold in pads. Bristol board and even heavier acid-free boards, frequently with smooth finishes, are used for drawing fine detail and do not distort when wet media (ink, washes) are applied. Vellum is extremely smooth and suitable for very fine detail. Coldpressed watercolor paper may be favored for ink drawing due to its texture.

Shading is the technique of varying the tonal values on the paper to represent the shade of the material as well as the placement of the shadows. Careful attention to reflected light, shadows and highlights can result in a very realistic rendition of the image.

Blending uses an implement to soften or spread the original drawing strokes. Blending is most easily done with a medium that does not immediately fix itself, such as graphite, chalk, or charcoal, although freshly applied ink can be smudged, wet or dry, for some effects. For shading and blending, the artist can use a blending stump, tissue, a kneaded eraser, a fingertip, or any combination of them. A piece of chamois is useful for creating smooth textures, and for removing material to lighten the tone. Continuous tone can be achieved with graphite on a smooth surface without blending, but the technique is laborious, involving small circular or oval strokes with a somewhat blunt point.

Shading techniques that also introduce texture to the drawing include hatching and stippling. Several other methods produce texture. In addition to the choice of paper, drawing material and technique affect the texture. Texture can be made to appear more realistic when it is drawn next to a contrasting texture; a coarse texture is more obvious when placed next to a smoothly blended area. A similar effect can be achieved by drawing different tones close together. A light edge next to a dark background stands out to the eye, and almost appears to float above the surface.

Here are some advantages of drawing, which you can get:

1. Develops Fine Motor Skills

Fine motor skills include any specialized movement of the hands, wrists, and fingers. As an adult, you rely on fine motor skills when you type, drive, or even text. It’s important for your child to develop strong fine motor skills at a young age.

2. Encourages Visual Analysis

Young children do not yet understand some concepts that you may take for granted, such as distance, size comparison, and textural differences. Drawing provides the perfect opportunity for your child to learn these concepts deliberately. Having a child draw specific items, especially concerning each other, can help him or her perform a fundamental visual analysis of everyday spaces. To support this kind of drawing at home, prompt your child to draw examples of big and small, rough and smooth, far and near, and so on.

3. Helps Establish Concentration

Because most children enjoy drawing, this activity provides time to establish the concepts of concentration and practice. These concepts will be essential to your child’s academic success, even in elementary school. Learning how to observe small details, concentrate on achieving a specific result, and practice tricky tasks helps your child mature.

4. Improves Hand-Eye Coordination

In addition to improving fine motor skills, drawing enables your child to draw connections between what he or she sees and what he or she does. This hand-eye coordination is important in athletic and recreational situations, as well as in academic scenarios such as penmanship lessons.

5. Increases Individual Confidence

As a parent or guardian, you probably love to hear the phrase, “Look what I made!” When your child has an opportunity to create physical representations of his or her imagination, thoughts, and experiences, he or she gains confidence. Drawing can help your child feel more intrinsic motivation, self-worth, and validity. This affirmation will make him or her more confident in other areas that may not come as naturally as drawing.

6. Teaches Creative Problem Solving

Along with visual analysis and concentration, drawing encourages your child to solve problems creatively. When he or she draws, your child must determine the best way to connect body parts, portray emotions, and depict specific textures. Providing specific drawing tasks, such as creating a family portrait, and talking about your child’s color, method, or special choices can help him or she develop stronger problem-solving skills over time.