ARTICLE ON AUTISTIC PRIDE DAY:

INTRODUCTION:

Autistic Pride Day is a pride celebration for autistic people held on June 18 each year. Autistic pride recognises the importance of pride for autistic people and its role in bringing about positive changes in the broader society.The color blue’s association to autism originated with the autism advocacy association known as Autism Speaks. Their “Light it Up Blue” campaign calls for people to wear blue to promote autism awareness.

SYMBOL:

Awareness Ribbon. The puzzle ribbon was adopted in 1999 as the universal sign of autism awareness. Autism is a lifelong, nonprogressive neurological disorder typically appearing before the age of three years. The word “autism” means a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and non-verbal communication and social interaction. … Autism is a spectrum disorder.

ORIGINS:

Organisations around the world celebrate Autistic Pride Day, with events around the world, to connect with one another through autistic events and demonstrate to allistic people (those not on the autism spectrum) that autistic people are unique individuals who should not be seen as cases for treatment. Writing for the Houston Press, Jef Rouner recommended five songs for Autistic Pride Day that celebrate difference and were written by autistic people.

Autistic pride points out that autistic people have always been an important part of human culture. Being autistic is a form of neuro diversity. As with all forms of neuro diversity, most of the challenges autistic people face come from other people’s attitudes about autism and a lack of supports and accommodations (ableism), rather than being essential to the autistic condition.

For instance, according to Larry Arnold and Gareth Nelson, many autism-related organizations promote feelings of pity for parents, rather than fostering understanding.

Autistic activists have contributed to a shift in attitudes away from the notion that autism is a deviation from the norm that must be treated or cured.

Autistic self-advocacy organizations, which are led and run by autistic people, are a key force in the movement for autistic acceptance and autistic pride.

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